The Young – And How To Lure Them Into Theaters

“For many teenagers, the idea of focusing on a single screen for an extended stretch is anathema”, writes Brooks Barnes in the NYT.

What does this mean for the movie industry?

…what really has the exhibition industry unnerved are two statistics released in the spring by the Motion Picture Association of America. Last year, despite a glut of extravagant action movies, the number of frequent moviegoers ages 18 to 24 dropped 17 percent, compared to a year earlier; the 12-to-17 age bracket dropped 13 percent.

Will billions at stake now and tens of billions at stake in the future (if changes to consumer behavior today persist into the future, as they most certainly will), movie theaters are experimenting with everything from

…seats buck and dip in close synchronization with the action on the screen. Compressed air blasts from headrests to simulate flying bullets. Fans provide a gentle wind effect.

to letting audiences bring in their iPads, showing text messages next to the big screen (!!!), providing a “270 degree” experience and more, says Barnes.

And the results?

Audiences – in the coveted 18-24 young male segment that’s being targeted here – seem to like many of these “innovations”. But since the 24+ demographic segment bought 58% of all tickets sold (source: this MPAA report), at least in in 2013, there is hope for purists such as this blogger, at least for the next 3-4 decades. 

Beyond that, we’ll probably just get movies streamed directly into our brains, with direct  neurological stimulation to produce just about any emotion or feeling (who needs real seats that shake when your brain feels the ground shake with just a few micro-amps of directed current?), Matrix-style.

Of Menus, Pricing And Revenue Maximization

The Guardian has an interesting article that everyone should read on how restaurants subtly manipulate patron behavior.

First on the menu, sorry, list, is the famous “anchor” Pricing strategy:

While you would assume that we read a menu from left to right, studies show that our eyes gravitate toward the upper right-hand corner first. This is often where the “anchor” – or the most profitable item – is located.

But this particular ploy is more cunning than simply getting you to buy the most expensive dishes: typically, having this usually quite costly dish listed will make everything look reasonably priced in comparison.

“Having an outrageously expensive item is both likely to get publicity for a restaurant, and will also get people to spend more,” says Charles Spence, experimental psychologist at the University of Oxford and co-author of The Perfect Meal: The Multisensory Science of Food and Dining.

“People think ‘I wonder if anyone ever orders that?’, without realising that its true purpose is to make the next most expensive item seem cheaper.”

Conversely, research suggests that diners look at the bottom left of a menu last, so this is where the least expensive dishes will be positioned.

Be sure to check out the rest of the article for other clever ways in which restaurants (and waiters) maximize their revenue on your next visit. 

Spicy Food And Loyal Customers

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So what’s behind everyone and their mother introducing spicy/hot flavors in packaged foods?

Customer Loyalty, says Sarah Nassauer in The WSJ.

“You get endorphins when you eat something really spicy,” which feels adventurous to flavor-seeking eaters, says Krista Lorio, senior manager of consumer insights forGeneral Mills Inc., which owns Cheerios, Betty Crocker and other brands. That experience can “create a lot of loyalty,” she says. The company recently started selling Helper Bold, a version of its boxed line of pasta that comes in Firehouse Chili Macaroni and other flavors.

Who knew…

9.6 Degrees, Cereal And Marketing To Kids

John Brownlee writes in Fast Company about a new study from Cornell’s Food and Brand lab about characters on kids’ cereal boxes:

Cereal boxes aimed at children are specifically designed so that the eyes of the mascots look downward, making direct eye contact with the sugar goblins that they are hoping to seduce.

In a study of over 65 cereals and 86 mascots across 10 different grocery stores in New York and Connecticut, Cornell’s Food and Brand Lab studied the characters on the front of cereal boxes. What they found is that all characters and people on cereal boxes –whether Lucky the Leprechaun, or Michael Jordan on a box of Wheaties–are designed to make eye contact with the intended consumer. In fact, they have almost exactly the same focal point: they are staring out from the box at a spot about four feet away, which is the average distance from the shelf of a customer walking down a supermarket aisle.

The result? When a character looks straight into your eyes, brand trust is 16% higher and brand connectivity, 28% higher.

Not sure whether to file this under the “interesting” category or the “disturbing” one. Perhaps both.

Adventures In Marketing A Delicious Yet Unfamiliar Product

What do you do when you have a delicious (and nutritious) product, but it sounds unfamiliar and off-putting to most when they hear about it?

You roam the country and indulge in reckless sampling (a theme that I cover a few days ago when talking about Kind Bars’ ballooning “sampling” budget).

Today, we consider the case of Sabra’s hummus – something that many Americans have been running into a lot over the last year or two.

Consider this:

Lucille Jennings is sitting in a mall in a suburb of Salt Lake City, about to have her first taste of hummus. The great-grandmother peels back the seal on a small cup of Sabra and peers at the beige mass inside. “You know what that reminds me of?” she says. “Chicken mesh. My mom and dad were farmers, and they ordered baby chicks through the mail. They fed them this kind of stuff.”

But,

According to Sabra, more than 70% of people who try it at a truck purchase some within 60 days. In the past five years, Sabra’s presence in households has gone up 118%. America is ready.

So, how did they respond?

 …in both product and marketing, Sabra has recalibrated to meet Americans where (and how) they already eat. Chief among its efforts: It has six colorful trucks roaming the country to hawk hummus, stopping in cities like Phoenix and Milwaukee for four to six weeks at a time. Staffers hand out tiny packs of the product at supermarkets and churches and Little League games, hoping to lure newbies.

Catch the rest of the story here.

Retail Manipulation

As I’ve wrote here in the past, though we think that we are mostly rational beings that carefully weigh any number of things before acting one way or the other, in reality, we are extremely susceptible to all kinds of external stimuli. 

Retailers, among others, know this of course, and employ every tool there is in their psychological arsenal to lighten our wallets. So how bad is it?

Consider this excerpt from an article that appeared in The Economist all the way back in 2008:

In the Sainsbury’s in Hatch Warren, Basingstoke, south-west of London, it takes a while for the mind to get into a shopping mode. This is why the area immediately inside the entrance of a supermarket is known as the “decompression zone”. People need to slow down and take stock of the surroundings, even if they are regulars. In sales terms this area is a bit of a loss, so it tends to be used more for promotion. Even the multi-packs of beer piled up here are designed more to hint at bargains within than to be lugged round the aisles. Wal-Mart, the world’s biggest retailer, famously employs “greeters” at the entrance to its stores. Whether or not they boost sales, a friendly welcome is said to cut shoplifting. It is harder to steal from nice people.

Immediately to the left in Sainsbury’s is another familiar sight: a “chill zone” for browsing magazines, books and DVDs, tempting impromptu purchases and slowing customers down. But those on a serious mission will keep walking ahead—and the first thing they come to is the fresh fruit and vegetables section.

For shoppers, this makes no sense. Fruit and vegetables can be easily damaged, so they should be bought at the end, not the beginning, of a shopping trip. But psychology is at work here: selecting good wholesome fresh food is an uplifting way to start shopping, and it makes people feel less guilty about reaching for the stodgy stuff later on.

And that’s just the beginning.

The rest of the piece goes into more detail about the many other ways in which shoppers are…influenced (sounds better than “manipulated”, no?), as they walk through the other aisles.

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